Posts Tagged ‘Tools and Resources’

Weekly EdTech Roundup, 2/23/2011

February 22nd, 2011

Pen en papier / Pen and paperphoto © 2009 Nationaal Archief | more info (via: Wylio)A useful post at ProfHacker outlines an interesting way to “Avoid ‘Grading Jail’ through Course Writing Contracts” in which students create their own due-dates and these serve as binding contracts. The papers trickle in throughout the semester and you’re faced with a little bit of reviewing/grading per day than a whole stack a few times per semester. I experimented with a similar approach by having a large class divided into groups that had rotating due dates. I also remember my Human Sexuality professor providing a list of response paper topics and their due-dates and we were instructed to complete any three of our choosing by the end of the semester. I suspect this worked particularly well because the topics were often personal and controversial and so interest is what drove our decision to choose an earlier paper rather than procrastination.

Will Richardson, author of “Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms” has a post outlining the difference between “online coursework” and “online learning” and his skepticism at the increased lauding of online courses as the silver-bullet of education reform.

Finally, as a follow up to last week’s post about Twitter and Classroom engagement, I appreciated this post at TeachPaperless on How Social Media Changed My Novel. The author cites Twitter and blogging as two major influences in the writing of his recent novel. Twitter helped him tune in to writing more succinctly and blogging helped him find his voice (and also provided a useful forum for feedback on drafts). The benefits and drawbacks that he discusses are readily applicable to your own writing and particularly to how students conceptualize and write-up their ideas in your classes.

Other notable bits:

Tools and Resources

February 1st, 2011

Podcasting Tutorials

Audacity Tutorial

iMovie

Windows Movie Maker

Camstudio

Educational Podcasts

 The Education Podcast Network (A site that gathers podcasts which support teaching and learning)

 Education Podcast (Podcasts from faculty, staff and students)

 Learnoutloud(A site that holds more than 2000 podcasts, ebooks, songs, videos)

http://recap.ltd.uk/podcasting/ (Collects podcasts from college and universities)

Openculture  (Podcasting from universities from all over the world)

Copyright Resources

The following links provide comprehensive information about fair use of copyrighted materials.

The United States Copyright Office

CUNY Copyright regulations

CUNY Commons copyrights WIKI

The University of Minnesota’s Copyright Information and Education site, Copyright Decision Map

Bound By Law? (Tales from the Public Domain)
The Duke Center for the Study of the Public Domain explains the regulations involving fair use.

The Creative Commons is a nonprofit group which allows you to obtain licenses which protect your own original work.

Podcasting Hosting Sites

Castpost – Free hosting for audio and video clips
Podbean – Free podcast hosting and publishing.
Pickstation – Good to use for podcasts and music.
Blubrry– Find, share and organize podcasts.
Evoca– With this site you can create audio files from your computer, phone or Skype. Share/embed them on websites.
MyPodcast – Podcast hosting site
 HeyCast– A tool to create video podcasts. Allows RSS feeds

© G. Guarnieri

Weekly Roundup: 11/29

November 29th, 2010

Do edtech bloggers rest over a holiday weekend? I think not! Lots of good ideas were percolating this week in between lots of eating and decorating. Here’s your roundup:

  • The promise and hope of distance education for renewing higher ed opportunities in Haiti is the subject of this Mashable! post. The table showing the losses to the higher education system in Haiti (from human casualties to building destruction) is tremendous. University of the people is constructing online work centers to help students gain access to distance learning programs to help continue their education while the universities are rebuilding.
  • In summarazing the need for a purposeful education technology plan, one of the key suggestions is to make use of “the disciplines.” In my previous work at LaGCC I found the discipline approach particularly helpful in encouraging faculty to identify writing projects/techniques specific to their students’ needs, what’s to say we can’t capitalize on it for encouraging technology use as well?
  • Honorable Mentions: Enter the Group for group collaboration; 18 Tasks You Can Crowdsource, from website design to transcription; and, as I wearily rub my eyes and reach for the eye drops I’m reminded of 5 Important Tips for Better Eye Health in a Digital World.
  • Irrelevant-but-too-humorous-not-to-post-bonus: Sesame Street’s savviness with social media never ceases to astound me. Their latest campaign? Cookie Monster to host SNL.

Weekly Roundup: 11/22

November 23rd, 2010

1. Blogging success: Organic integration. Erica, a blogger at Cac.ophony, finds that blogging has been embraced by students in her course. They eagerly share other bits of media and relate classic works to current events. The blogs have produced some of the best writing in her course, but she wonders, how can excellent blog posts make the jump to well-written course papers? Chris Clark at NspireD2 was also a blog skeptic, at first, but outlines 8 strategies for using blogs in a course that have turned him from skeptic to convert. Already using blogs in your class? Check out this post on developing blog grading rubrics.

2. Presentation success: Beginning with a story. NML Blogger Shawndel offers her tips for developing “organic” presentations through digital storytelling and Prezi (full disclosure: I’m a recent Prezi convert myself). Though he takes a completely different approach, discussing the use of Powerpoint for presenting forensic evidence, Slaw blogger Nils begins with a similar point, the best presentations start with knowing the story you want to tell.

3. Technology in Education. If you’re reading this post you probably don’t need convincing about the power of technology for education. But if you want to see some very cool examples, check out Mashable’s post on 8 ways technology is improving education. Although, some students in Ohio may beg to differ, now that “snow days” have become “e-days.”

Honorable Mentions:

(Blog wordle via Flickr from KristinaB)

Weekly Roundup: 11/15

November 15th, 2010

Start your Monday out right, with a recap of useful bits from the IT world:

css.php
Need help with the Commons? Visit our
help page
Send us a message
Skip to toolbar